Aycock at the announcement of Martin Brinkley being named the dean of Carolina Law. (2015)
Aycock at the announcement of Martin Brinkley being named the dean of Carolina Law. (2015)

Welcome to the Kathrine R. Everett Law Library’s digital library in remembrance of William B. Aycock. Here, you can explore some of the digitized materials the library has collected about William B. Aycock’s life. You can explore our library of his selected speeches, articles, and other works. You can browse a photo gallery of him, read a few selected interviews or watch videos about his legacy. You can also read a selection of tributes to his work and his legacy.

Chancellor William B. Aycock was not only a legendary law professor at the University of North Carolina School of Law, he also led the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill through a time of tremendous change and political division. He led the University during the contentious Speaker Ban years.

Aycock during his time as chancellor, 1957 - 1964.
Aycock during his time as chancellor, 1957 – 1964.

Through navigating political and other challenges to the university, Chancellor Aycock’s “mind was clear about the purpose of the school: it existed to teach, to do research, and to perform services of an appropriate nature for the state.” He directed the university during a time of tremendous growth.

Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Department of History, Professor James L. Godfrey remarked about his tenure as Chancellor, “Aycock’s brilliance was not in conceptualizing the proper role of this University but in achieving the desired level of higher performance.”

After Chancellor Aycock completed his tenure as Chancellor, he continued to speak out on issues important to the university, including his continued opposition to the speaker ban, his belief in academic freedom, and his support for the Equal Rights Amendment. His commitment to the University of North Carolina manifest in his continued service and teaching at the law school. Former Dean and Emeritus Law Faculty member Kenneth Broun has described him as, “the ideal faculty member. He has achieved superiority in teaching, in scholarship and in public service.”

We hope you will take time to read the various speeches, tributes, and articles posted here to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for the efforts and influence of Chancellor William B. Aycock.

 

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